Lawsuit Reform is a Common Sense Bipartisan Issue

Lawsuit reform is an issue that enjoys wide-ranging bipartisan support, with demonstrated appeal to advocates of small government and progressive government alike. All Americans have an interest in the fundamental rule of law and in the fair and justified treatment of participants in our economy. As lawsuit reform aims to pursue accurate justice, so it aims to keep the economy properly functioning.

Oklahoma legislators recently voted in bipartisan majorities to reinstate more than two dozen lawsuit reforms that had previously been struck down on a technicality by the state supreme court. Alabama passed a key lawsuit reform with overwhelming majorities this year, while Utah and Virginia enacted common-sense lawsuit reform policies with little-to-no opposition. A number of lawsuit reforms developed by members of the American Legislative Exchange Council have proven to be helpful guides for lawmakers around the country.

Voters in both parties also strongly support lawsuit reform. A 2012 poll compiled by Luce Research and sponsored by the American Tort Reform Association and the Sick of Lawsuits Campaign found that 89 percent of respondents consider lawsuit abuse a problem (broken down by party: 94 percent of Republicans, 89 percent of Independents and 86 percent of Democrats). When asked if there are too many lawsuits, 78 percent of respondents said yes (89 percent of Republicans, 78 percent of Independents and 70 percent of Democrats).

 Lawsuit-Reform

As if state lawmakers need further encouragement to bring lawsuit reform to their states, 73 percent of all respondents said they would vote for a candidate who supports lawsuit reform. The public is ready for true lawsuit reform in order to foster more favorable justice and business climates.

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